STC Number - 416

China's import ban on fresh mangosteen

Maintained by: China
Raised by: Indonesia
Supported by:
First date raised: October 2016 G/SPS/R/84 paras. 3.12-3.13
Dates subsequently raised: March 2017 (G/SPS/R/86 paras. 3.28-3.30)
November 2017 (G/SPS/R/88 paras. 3.30-3.31)
Number of times subsequently raised: 2
Relevant documents: Raised orally
Products covered: 0804 Dates, figs, pineapples, avocados, guavas, mangoes and mangosteens, fresh or dried.

Fresh mangosteens
Primary subject keyword: Food safety
Keywords: Control, Inspection and Approval Procedures; Food safety; Human health; Plant health
Status: Not reported
Solution:
Date reported as resolved:

Extracts from SPS Committee meeting summary reports

In October 2016, Indonesia expressed its concern regarding China's import ban on fresh mangosteen fruit since February 2013. Indonesia recognized China's right to adopt measures to protect human, animal and plant health, but considered the measures to be more trade restrictive than necessary and discriminatory. Indonesia reported that it had taken actions to resolve the alleged pest and heavy metal contamination detected on its mangosteen fruits. Such actions included field and laboratories verification, as well as negotiations with China on its proposed export protocol. Indonesia further expressed its appreciation to China for a field verification visit held in August 2014, and hoped to receive the report soon. Indonesia requested that China comply with Articles 2.3, 5.6, 7, 8 and Annex C (1a) of the SPS Agreement in order to resume mangosteen trade between the two countries, and expressed its willingness to continue bilateral engagement.

China stated that in 2013 it had detected quarantine pests and measured levels of cadmium above the level specified in its standard in Indonesian's mangosteen exports. China said that despite several bilateral consultations, the two sides had not been able to agree on the protocol issues yet. China urged Indonesia to continue to work closely with the competent authority of China with a view to finding a mutually satisfactory solution to the pending issue.

In March 2017, Indonesia reiterated its concern regarding China's import ban on fresh mangosteen fruit since 2013. Indonesia recognized China's right to adopt measures to protect human, animal and plant health, but noted SPS measures should not be discriminatory nor more trade restrictive than necessary. Indonesia reported that it had taken actions to resolve the alleged pest and heavy metal contamination detected on its mangosteen fruits. Such actions included field and laboratories verification, as well as accommodating China's Draft Export Protocol.

Indonesia explained that all procedures required for the export of mangosteen fruits to China had been completed, and therefore urged a positive response from China to resolve the issue. Indonesia expressed its willingness to continue bilateral engagement.

China stated that in 2013 it had detected quarantine paraputo hispidus and other harmful organisms and had measured levels of cadmium in Indonesia's mangosteen exports above the level specified in its standard. China noted that following several inspections and consultations, China and Indonesia had reached consensus on the Protocol of Phytosanitary Requirements for exporting mangosteens from Indonesia to China in September 2016. China reported that it was conducting the relevant internal legal procedures, and urged Indonesia to continue working closely with the competent authority of China with a view to finding a mutually satisfactory solution to the issue.

In Novemebr 2017, Indonesia reiterated its concern regarding China's import ban on fresh mangosteen fruit. Indonesia reported on its corrective actions to resolve the contamination detected on its mangosteen fruit, which had been verified by China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ), resulting in a draft protocol for mangosteen exports. However, Indonesia regretted the protocol had not been signed. Indonesia added that it had engaged in bilateral negotiations with China and had opened its market to garlic and other products from China, aiming at balancing bilateral trade. Indonesia finally requested that China comply with its obligations under the SPS Agreement.

China responded that in 2013, quarantine pests had been detected on fresh mangosteen from Indonesia, which resulted in an import suspension. China added that following bilateral consultations and an onsite investigation, both parties agreed on a protocol for plant quarantine requirements in September 2016. China urged Indonesia to complete the pending follow-up work and promote the healthy development of trade of agricultural products between China and Indonesia.