STC Number - 377

Brazil's regulation on international certificates for fish and fishery products

Maintained by: Brazil
Raised by: China
Supported by:
First date raised: July 2014 G/SPS/R/75 paras. 4.13 - 4.14
Dates subsequently raised:
Number of times subsequently raised: 0
Relevant documents: G/SPS/N/BRA/901
Products covered: 03 Fish and crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic invertebrates
Primary subject keyword: Animal Health
Keywords: Animal health; Control, Inspection and Approval Procedures; Food safety; Undue delays
Status: Not reported
Solution:
Date reported as resolved:

Extracts from SPS Committee meeting summary reports

China raised its concerns regarding Brazil's regulation on international certificates for fish and fishery products. Brazil's regulation standardized international certificates for fish and fishery products exported to Brazil and required all countries, except Argentina, Canada, Chile and Uruguay, to provide certificates for these food products. The entry into force of the regulation had been notified on 1 January 2014, however, the new version of the certificate was only circulated by Brazil on 21 January 2014. On receipt of the sample certificate, China had requested Brazil to grant a transitional period for the replacement of the certificate with the additional suggestion that the old certificate remain valid before both parties confirmed the new certificate. The request for a transitional period refused was refused, but Brazil had agreed that detained goods would be cleared if the old certificate were replaced. In April 2014, China issued a new certificate for the goods at the Brazilian ports, however, 170 batches of goods bearing the new certificate were retained at the port. China urged Brazil to grant a transitional period for the replacement of its old certificate and to promptly allow the clearance of the batch of detained goods.

Brazil indicated that it would not be able to provide a detailed response as they had been informed of this trade concern at a short notice. Additional information had been requested from China to assist Brazil in identifying the problem. However, based on initial information received from its authorities, and subject to further verification, the list of 170 detained goods was outdated. Brazil indicated its commitment to resolve the issue and requested China to provide the relevant details, including the number of detained goods and the reasons identified for the detention of the goods.